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Saturday, October 21, 2017

Inspired by . . . Sing to Jesus: Day 21

Continuing the #write31day challenge  . . . you can find the entire series here.


Today's Reading:


Today's Offering:

At first glance, Psalm 21 may not seem applicable to our modern lives, far removed from kings and kingdoms. But we can learn much from King David. Not only from the chronicle of his life, recorded in previous books of the Bible but perhaps even more so from the Psalms written for and by him. For it is in the psalms where we see David's heart.

What do we see in Psalm 21? We see the powerful and anointed King David giving all the glory to God. His victories in battle, his rise to the kingship, everything David has or has accomplished he attributes to his Lord. 

This humility was not a one-time thing in David's life. It was a pattern and, I believe, his humility before God was one of the reasons God called him a man after His own heart.

The pattern of humility continues in Psalm 51. 
Against You only have I sinned and have done was displeases; (vs 4)
God, create a pure heart for me, and give me a new and steadfast spirit. (vs 10)
God, my sacrifice is a broken spirit; You, God, will not despise a chastened heart. (vs 17)
There are parts of Psalm 51 I pray often. I hope you will too.

In Psalm 81 we again find Asaph, one of David's lead musicians, praising God and speaking the cry of God's heart, "If My people would but listen to Me . . ." (vs 13) You can almost feel the anguish God must feel when His people ignore His word. It reminds me of Christ weeping over Jerusalem.

Psalm 111 is one to sing to Jesus and holds a hidden gem:
The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom, and they who live by it grow in understanding. (vs 10)
Finally, Psalm 141 holds a prayer that many of us might find beneficial to pray often:
Lord, set a guard on my mouth; keep watch at the door of my lips, (vs 3)
Praise the Lord! With all my heart I shall give thanks to the Lord. Great are the works of the Lord. His deeds are full of majesty and wonder; His righteousness stands sure for ever. In the name of Jesus, Amen.

Shalom,










Friday, October 20, 2017

Inspired by . . . Sing to Jesus: Day 20

Continuing the #write31day challenge  . . . you can find the entire series here.


Today's Reading:


Today's Offering:

Are you facing a battle today? Then Psalm 20 is for you. This psalm is the prayer of the king on the eve of battle. But you can make it your own. God is faithful.

Psalm 50 contains some verses that may challenge our understanding and view of God.
God, the Lord God, has spoken and summoned the world (vs 1)
When you have done these things, and kept silent, you thought that I was someone like yourself; (vs 21)
The whole world? Yes. Summoned them (us) to what? Listen. Follow. Act.

How often do we bring God down to our level? and view Him and His actions on human terms. There is a clear warning here.

The following psalms, 80 and 110, point to the Messiah and fill us with hope for the future.
Let Your hand rest on the one at Your right side, the one whom you have made strong for Your service. (Psalm 80:17)
Sit at my right hand, and I shall make your enemies your footstool. (Psalm 110:1 cf Matt 22:42-45)
You are a priest for ever, a Melchizedek in My service. (Psalm 110:4 cf Heb 7:17)
Oh, Beloved, these verses stir my soul and ignite my anticipation for Advent . . . just a few weeks away!

Truly Jesus is God's answer to our pleas for mercy!

I wonder how often Jesus sang these songs about Himself and wept over the blindness of those who listened.

Let us not be deaf to their message today.

Shalom,






Thursday, October 19, 2017

Inspired by . . . Sing to Jesus: Day 19

Continuing the #write31day challenge  . . . you can find the entire series here.


Today's Reading:


Today's Offering:

I'm overwhelmed by today's readings. I could spend a day expounding on each one. Psalm 19 ends with a prayer that we would be wise to begin with:
Cleanse me of any secret fault. Hold back Your servant also from willful sins, lest they get the better of me.
The psalm begins by putting us properly in a place of humility before the awesome and awe-inspiring God we serve. (vs 1-6)

Psalm 49 reminds us that we could never pay the price for our sins. (vs 7) and assures us that God will do what we cannot. (vs 15)

Psalm 79 is a cry for national justice. This psalm is one of three that are attributed to Asaph, one of David's chief musicians. He was a Levite, in Jerusalem at the time it was overtaken by the Babylonians. 

In contrast, Psalm 109 is a cry for personal justice. I find it hard sometimes to concur with the complete lack of compassion in some of these verses. But it's important to remember that David was God's chosen and anointed king. For the same reason that David would not lift a hand against Saul, actions taken against David were viewed as being taken against God Himself.

I think it is difficult for us to see sin as the dark evil it truly is. We prefer to view things in shades of grey. [click to tweet]

Psalm 139 wraps everything neatly together. Reminding us that, "You Lord know all about it." And that no matter where we are, God is with us.

I can't decide which is the better prayer to end with, so I'm incorporating them both!

May the words of my mouth and the thoughts of my mind be acceptable to You, Lord, my Rock and my Redeemer! (Psalm 19:14)

Examine me, God, and know my mind; test me, and understand my anxious thoughts.  Watch lest I follow any path that grieves You; lead me in the everlasting way. (Psalm 139:23-24)

In the name of Jesus, Amen.

Shalom,